SRM



 THE GENERAL AVIATION SAFETY TOPIC OF THE MONTH

SINGLE-PILOT RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (SRM)
Single-pilot resource management is de­fined as the managing of all resources available to a pilot, both on-board the aircraft and from outside sources prior to and during a flight to ensure its successful conclusion.

It is about gathering information, analysing it, and taking decisions based on it.

It requires a pilot to perform a number of mental tasks in addition to the physical task of basic aircraft control, including:
·         Situational awareness
·         Task management
·         Automation management
·         Risk management
·         Aeronautical decision-making
·         CFIT (controlled-flight-into-terrain) awareness
This can be a challenge for GA pilots, whose flying experience may be limited, and the incorporation of SRM into GA pilot training is an important step forward in aviation safety.
When a flight is operated by a single pilot, that pilot has various inside and outside resources available to assist with the flight. The key is how to identify and effectively use these resources, which include:
·   Passengers, even those with no flying experience. Use them to read out checklist items or watch for traffic. With a bit of instruction, they can also help listen for radio calls or assist with switching radio frequencies
·    If the aircraft is so equipped, one could teach frequent passengers some basic programming skills for the moving map and multifunction displays
·   Reading the checklist out loud, and touching the appropriate switch or control. Talk to yourself – as a solo flyer nobody’s listening!
·    On-board equipment, both panel-mount­ed and hand-held, is an important internal resource. Today’s technology offers an incredible range of information to assist with overall situational awareness, navigation, weather information, and much more. The key to benefiting from this resource is to know your devices: long before you leave the ground, know what information is available and make sure you know how to access it without unduly diverting your attention from essential aircraft control duties.
Tony Birth